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Dangers of Multiple Ingredient Medications Part 2

Dangers of Multiple Ingredient Medications Part 2

As mentioned in our previous blog, choosing which over-the-counter medications to reduce cold symptoms can be overwhelming. Many cold relief products include a variety of medications in order to fight symptoms with one dose. The convenience of this product comes with risks to medication safety. 

ConsumerMedSafety.org, published by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, specifies two problems with multiple active-ingredient medicines: taking unnecessary medication and double dosing medication ingredients in combination products. This blog will focus on double dosing ingredients. 


Duplicate or double dosing is an issue. With cold relief products that contain more than one active-ingredient, users can commonly be unaware of what they are taking. Inadvertent use of another medication containing the same medication or class of medication is a known problem. As mentioned in PharmacistConsult.org, ‘Often, individuals take combination products alongside other combination products or stand-alone products. Without paying close attention to ingredients that are contained within each product, it is easy to duplicate active ingredients needlessly.’ For example, in combination products that use ibuprofen (a commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, NSAID), users may take another ibuprofen-containing product such as brand name Advil or another NSAID such as naproxen sodium or brand name Aleve. Overdosing can have negative consequences on the kidney, stomach, heart, and vascular system, in particular. 


The Mayo Clinic suggests that one selects relief products based on the symptoms you are experiencing. By limiting excess medications, there is a lower safety risk. Consult a pharmacist if you have any questions about what to take. Consumer MedicationSafety.org advises to review these steps when exploring over-the-counter (OTC) medications. 

  • ‘Read the Active Ingredients section of the Drug Facts label on all OTC medicines, and be sure each active ingredient is not being taken in more than one product.
  • Read the Uses section of the Drug Facts label on all OTC medicines, and use multi-symptom products that only treat the actual symptoms you have (e.g., cough, fever, congestion, discomfort).
  • If taking OTC and prescription medicines at the same time, be sure the prescription medicine does not contain one of the same active ingredients as the OTC medicine.
  • If you are unsure of the active ingredients in either OTC or prescription medicines, contact your local pharmacist for assistance.’

 

What separates Cold FAid® kits from other cold relief is the inclusion of single active-ingredient medication. Cold FAid® uses: 

  • antihistamine: Chlorpheniramine Maleate; 
  • decongestant: Phenylephrine HCl, 
  • anti-inflammatory (NSAID): Naproxen Sodium. 

Additionally, the Cold FAid® app allows you to track your medications and receive reminders for each dose.You will be in charge knowing what medications you to take, when and how to appropriately consume them. 


We, at Cold FAid®, advise you to always check medical labels in order to ensure your and your family’s safety. Stay healthy!

Dangers of Multiple Ingredient Cold Relief Medications: Part 1

Dangers of Multiple Ingredient Cold Relief Medications: Part 1

Once you’ve come down with a cold, the goal is to get better as soon as possible. The over-the-counter medication options can be overwhelming. Most common cold relief products include a combination of medications. These products are designed to have ingredients work together to combat symptoms with the benefit of taking only one product. For example, a combination drug can act as a multi-symptom product, as commonly seen with cold relief, and contain an antihistamine, decongestant and anti-inflammatory.  Although this offers a convenience, the multiple active-ingredient concept raises red-flags in reference to medication safety. 


According to the ConsumerMedSafety.org, published by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, two specific problems exist with multiple active-ingredient medicines: (1) taking unnecessary medication when you only need one, not all, of the active ingredients; (2) double dosing medication when an unwary user does not realize the ingredients that are contained in combination products. In this blog, we will examine the first problem. Since all medications have potential adverse effects, you don’t want to take medication if it is not going to be useful.  For example, with a cold, clinical studies indicate that antihistamines have a limited 2-day use in order to gain benefit. After 2 days (48 hours) of a cold, antihistamines should not be taken. Additionally, clinical studies reveal that antihistamines are only effective in treating runny nose, watery eyes and sneezing when used in conjunction with a decongestant. So, concomitant use is necessary to achieve any results in these first 2 days of a cold. Lastly, the type of antihistamines used for a cold must be a first-generation antihistamine. All of these are categorized as a sedative. Therefore, alcoholic beverages and other sedatives should be avoided while taking antihistamines. Medication warnings such as these reinforce the importance of only taking a medication that brings benefit. More about this topic will be discussed in a subsequent blog. 


Unlike other cold medications, Cold FAid® kits include single active-ingredient medications that will help your recovery in no time! Thus, Cold FAid® provides a superior safety profile. Cold FAid® uses: 

  • antihistamine: Chlorpheniramine Maleate; 
  • decongestant: Phenylephrine HCl, 
  • anti-inflammatory (NSAID): Naproxen Sodium. 

With these stand-alone products in our kit, you know exactly what medication you are taking and how much of it you are ingesting.


Stay healthy from a cold this summer with Cold FAid®!

Summer BBQ

Summer BBQ

With summer in full swing, finding new recipes is a way to embrace the season. Between eating seasonal produce to grilling main and side dishes, the summer months bring about an opportunity to add new variations to your meals. 


Using seasonal produce is a wonderful way to incorporate value foods with vitamins and minerals into your meals. Apples are common during the middle to end of the summer. According to the USDA and The Spruce Eats, among other fruits, apricots, cantaloupe, lemons, limes, peaches, plums and watermelons are in season. Berries, like blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, and strawberries, also grow during summer months. Before baking or cooking with these sweet products, find a local farm near you to pick your own berries! Use PickYourOwn.org in order to find a U-pick farm near you. Bell peppers, carrots, beets, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, okra, summer squash, tomatoes, and zucchini are summer vegetables. Many people grow herbs. With herbs, make sure to look for lively leaves and crisp stems. Basil can become bitter after flowers have grown. Garlic is the sweetest in summer and fall time. With extra fresh produce, check out canning. Here is an article that introduces canning. 


Grilling is a great summer activity. Grilled meats, vegetables, fruits, and sides can be the perfect addition to any meal.  Gas, Charcoal, Kamado, and Pellet grills are just a few of the types available. Each grill has advantages, including taste, cook time, and convenience. If debating which grill to buy, check out this article from Build.com. Once you have a grill, check out these swift grilling recipes from Food & Wine. Along with these previous links, explore other summer recipes from the New York Times and 75 Easy Dinner recipes from Delish


We, at Cold FAid®, hope you and your family enjoy healthy and delicious meals this summer.